Hanse Kogge von Bremen – My Completed Card Model

We’ve been following the build of Shipyard’s Hanse Kogge, Bremen 1390 laser cut kit. This card model was built by Clare Hess, who has been maintaining a build log on Then NRG’s ModelShipWorld.

The 1/72-scale model project was completed recently, and will soon be on display in our shop in San Lorenzo, CA, which we hope will be reopening this Summer.

Ship Modeler

I’m happy to announce the completion of my Shipyard laser-cut card model of the 14th century Bremen cog. The model kit is officially called Hanse Kogge von Bremen, 1380, and it is one of the newest kits from the Polish company.

Over the past few weeks, I’ve been putting a lot more effort into the build, dealing with the sail and rigging. I haven’t done much rigging in a while, so it was a bit of an effort to get back into it. Fortunately, with only one mast and one yardarm, the amount of rigging required is pretty small. Still, when seeing light at the end of the tunnel, every detail seemed to take longer and longer to complete. But, knowing that completion was near was great motivation to keep at it.

Yesterday, I made and added rope coils at all the belaying pins and cleats, when I realized there were…

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Building A Master Korabel Ship’s Boat Kit

Master Korabel makes some 1/72-scale ship’s boat kits that may be the ultimate, most accurately detailed ship’s boats available for your ship model. They’re also pretty complex kits that might make for an excellent small weekend(week?) project for experience ship modelers, and nice small stand-alone display models.

Here’s the first part of the build of Master Korabel’s MK0101 95mm Ship’s Boat kit.

If you want to try one out for yourself, we have all three of their ship’s boat kits available. Each sells for just $24.99, and is a good introduction to what Master Korabel kits are all about.

https://www.agesofsail.com/ecommerce/new-master-korbel/ship-and-boat-kits.html

Ship Modeler

Master Korabel is a Russian wooden ship model kit manufacturer that have been sold in the U.S. for a couple years now. They’re kits are all in a scale of 1:72 and they’re developed using Computer Aided Design, or CAD.

They have a fairly limited offering at this time with seven wooden kits of ships , none with more than two masts. But they also have three ship’s boat kits ranging from a 4-oared yawl, 2-3/4″ long, to a 10-oared ship’s boat, 3-1/2″ long. I picked up the larger of the ship’s boats kits to get an idea of how these kits go together

The largest ship’s boat kit, MK0101, is 95mm long, or about 3-1/2″. About the first thing I did after opening up the kit and laying everything out was to put it all right back in the box. I was just too taken aback by how thin…

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More RC – Introducing Aero-Naut Kits from Germany

Note: We originally posted this yesterday. But our posts get put onto our Facebook page automatically, and unfortunately, when talking about how things are getting back to normal, we mentioned the word see-oh-vee-eye-dee. We have to put the word here phonetically, so that Facebook doesn’t catch it and limit our ability to share the post.  We’re not going to use the “c” word here and hope it works better this time!

So, as the Summer quickly approaches, more and more of us are able to get out and enjoy the outdoors. That doesn’t mean you have to abandon ship modeling! Take it outdoors with these great RC kits we’ve just brought in from Aero-Naut of Germany.

These Aero-naut kits are all designed for RC operation. Some feature wooden hulls and some have plastic hulls. But, all will allow you to install your own choice of radio control equipment.

We currently have sixteen kits to choose from, from sport boats and fishing boats, to workboats and battleships. And, all of the kits we sell include the fittings. So, it’s not necessary to buy a separate fittings set.

Take a look at just some of the Aero-Naut products we now carry…

Battleship Bismark

1:200-scale Battleship Bismark measures a little over 49″ long.

The Victoria Luxury Yacht

The mahogany hulled Victoria luxury yacht.

 

The Anna 3 Fishing Boat

The Anna 3 fishing boat.

Aqua-Race Outboard Motor Mounts

The Aqua-Race 50 outboard motor mount.

Check out all the Aero-Naut products we carry at Ages of Sail here.

www.agesofsail.com

Shaping Trim Moldings with Artesania Latina’s Micro Shapers

Those of you who want to add some nice details to your model without going out and buying specialty shaped strips of wood or brass should take a look at these two tool sets from Artesania Latina.

Artesania Latina Micro Shapers

Micro Shapers Set A

Micro Shapers are scrapers, each with 15 to 16 pre-cut specialty bead molding shapes. There are two sets available, and each set contains 3 different shapers, you just have to cut them loose from the sheet.

Artesania Latina Micro Shapers

Micro Shapers Set B

To use them, you simply scrape lightly against the appropriate sized strip wood. This is how to add fine detailed elegance to your ship model.

Artesania Latina has even created a nice little Youtube video, illustrating how to use them.

We carry each of these sets for $12.99, plus tax and shipping. Check them out, along with the whole range of Artesania Latina’s specialty ship modeling tools here at Ages of Sail . Ω

Kolderstok’s Batavia Build on Model Ship World

Batavia was a ship of the Dutch East India Company, built in Amsterdam in 1628. She was a type of ship known as a “Retourship” . These were well armed and heavily manned ships design for round-trip voyages from the Netherlands to the East Indies. Ship modeler drobinson02199 on the ModelShipWorld.com, completed his build of the Batavia last Fall, based on a kit from the Dutch ship model kit company Kolderstok.

David’s beautifully built Batavia is a 1/72-scale model just under 35″ in length. Kolderstok calls the difficulty level a 3+ on a scale of 1 to 4, so anyone taking on this model kit should make sure they have plenty of experience in other wooden ship model builds. David had some very nice things to say about the quality of the kit and the instructions, which a photo based, with all text written in both Dutch and English.

Here are some photos of David’s model, which he gave us permission to use here.

If you are interested in reading more about David’s build, you can read his build log on Model Ship World here: Batavia Build

And, if you think you might be interested in building this kit yourself, you can check it out, along with the whole range of Kolderstok products we carry, at Ages of Sail here: Kolderstok at Ages of Sail

 

Improving Basic Details – Getting the Gratings Right

Here are some tips geared towards beginning ship modelers about making the most of the hatch cover gratings in your kit builds.

Ship Modeler

Gratings are common a feature seen on old ships, as they can be used in place of hatch covers to allow ventilation below decks. They’re also be useful for standing on to keep out of pooling water and to maintain one’s footing on a wet deck. On a model, they are a feature can stand out as an indicator of the builder’s attention to detail, or the quality of a kit, for good or bad. Now, there are a few ways to make your own from scratch, which is what I do, but you don’t have to go that far to simply improve the look of the gratings on your model. Here are a couple simple things you can do to improve their appearance on your kit-built model.

Grating on my model of the Colonial Schooner Independence

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A Wooden Wütender Hund Cog Model Build

While it might be in a different language, it’s still nice to find a beautifully executed model built from a kit from the Polish card manufacturer, Shipyard. In this case, this is one of the recent wooden kits produced of a medieval cog they call the Wütender Hund.

Shipyard’s wooden kits are almost identical to their laser-cut card model kits, just in thin wood. Being wood, they require no painting. But, an application of a nice finish makes for a beautiful looking model.

At Ages of Sail, we carry two wooden Shipyard kits, the Wütender Hund and the Kogge von Kampen, as well as the two laser-cut card model kits Wütender Hund and Hanse Kogge von Bremen.

Find all the Shipyard cog kits here: https://www.agesofsail.com/ecommerce/paper-kits/cog-kits.html

Ship Modeler

As I work to finish up my Shipyard laser-cut card model of the Bremen Cog, I’ve been following a couple other builds of similar models. One that I just ran across today is on a German model building forum.

The build is well photo documented and the builder is doing a beautiful job. His model is not the same subject as mine – He’s building the wooden Shipyard kit called the Wütender Hund, or the “Angry Dog”. The hull is very similar to mine, which is officially called the Hanse Kogge von Bremen, 1380, but the stern castle and forecastle are based on historical images of other cogs.

Wütender Hund model by “Pietpieterszoon”

Anyway, you might want to check this out. It’s not complete – the builder was working on the model in November and December and is just about to get to the rigging stage. But, it’s very nicely…

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Big Plastic Warship Kits Now in Stock – Trumpeter, Fujimi, Tamiya, ICM

Ages of Sail is more than just wooden model sailing ships. Because many of our customers like to build modern ships too, and those are mostly plastic kits, we’ve expanded our inventory, and just added over 100 high-end plastic model kits from Fujimi, Tamiya, ICM, and Trumpeter.

Trumpeter 1:350 scale USS New York LPD-21

Tamiya Japanese Submarine I400

Fujimi 1/350 scale Japanese aircraft carrier Hiryu

Use the Links below or view all plastic kits here: https://www.agesofsail.com/ecommerce/plastic-kits.html

Fujimi

ICM

Tamiya

Trumpeter

Ω

 

Improving Basic Details – Wayward Blocks

Here’s a little building tip aimed at the beginning ship modeler. It’s all about getting your rigging blocks mounted the right way. Seems like it should be obvious, but maybe not for everyone.

Ship Modeler

This is really more for beginning ship modelers. Experienced ship modelers, and probably most beginners too already understand the way a standard rigging block works. It’s basically just a wooden block with a pulley, or sheave, inside a slot. There are different sizes and types, and there are single, double, and triple blocks, and just about ever wooden ship model needs at least some number of blocks.

Standard Amati single-sheave walnut blocks

There is one mistake I occasionally see regarding blocks. But, the thing is, after a modeler completes so much work on the hull, deck details, masts, and all, I really don’t want to point out the error. But, it’s such an obvious error that it detracts from the entire build. So, I figured I’d mention it here.

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Hanse Kogge Bremen – Continuing a Shipyard Laser-Cut Model Build

This model built from Shipyard’s Hanse Kogge von Bremen, 1380 kit is getting very close to completion. This is one of three Shipyard cog model builds that we’ve found on the Internet. The others are build’s of one of Shipyard’s wooden kits, which are as detailed and as thoroughly designed as this card model kit.

If you’re interested in building your own kit from Shipyard, you can find them all here: https://www.agesofsail.com/ecommerce/paper-kits.html at Ages of Sail.

Ship Modeler

I published a post about building this Shipyard card model kit a couple weeks ago, and I’m working pretty steadily to get it done. I’m not done yet, but I’m getting close, and I thought I should post an update this weekend.

After my last post, I finished making the mast and yard and finished detailing the sail. I have to say that I really enjoyed working on the sail. It was kind of a lengthy process lacing the bonnet to the main sail, but it was also something I could just do without having to think about too much.

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