Beautiful Corel Wasa Build

There’s a lot of great ship modeling work that’s available to view on the Internet. Here’s a really beautifully done model of the Swedish warship Wasa (or Vasa) based on a kit from the popular Italian manufacturer, Corel.

The 1/75-scale model was built by ship modeler Frank Moda, Jr. and completed last year.

Mr. Moda enhanced the look of the model with the use of gold leaf, making his model look like a treasure piece. He also made use of some after-market parts to further enhance his work, though as you can see, his work really doesn’t need any enhancing.

Rigged with a suite of flying sails and furled sails, this model is a real masterpiece.

Corel kits can be a real challenge, and the Wasa is one of the most complicated of them all. You need to be good at reading plans to take this model on. Don’t expect step-by-step written instructions to guide you along. But, if you’ve got a few ship models under your belt, and are looking for a something that will put your skills to the test and make a beautiful model, Corel’s Wasa is something you should consider.

You can visit Mr. Moda’s build log on Model Ship World, which will certainly help anyone building this kit. Click Here.

If you’re interested in purchasing this kit, keep in mind, this 35″ long model is one Corel’s top-of-the-line kits. Check it out here, at Ages of Sail.

Amati Swedish Gunboat Build – Part 5

Here’s the latest installment of a modified build of Amati’s Swedish Gunboat kit. This is one of the least expensive kits from Amati and this provides a good example of what can be done with this kit of a very unique type of vessel from 18th century Northern Europe.

The Ship Modeler

With another ship modelers’ get-together coming up again in just over 3 weeks, it’s time to take a look at our group project, the Amati Swedish Gunboat. Still, nobody has finished their model, but three of us are in striking distance of completion and I’ll be wrapping up my project in the next couple months.

I was partly inspired to finish up this model after seeing photos of the model built by ship modeler Junichi Yamashita of the Japanese ship model society The Rope. The model was beautifully done and was part of the society’s 42nd annual exhibition. Below are just a few photos of this nicely done model, courtesy of The Rope.

You can see more photos of this model on their website:

https://www.theropetokyo.org/展示会作品集/第42回展-2017年/第42回展-2-4/

Just scroll down the page to model entry 42-18 and click on the photo.

On my own model, I began by drilling out the…

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More Supplies and Paints

Ages of Sail has carried a range of instant glues from BSI, we decided to carry wood these classic wood glues. As most ship modelers already know, these glues offer strong bonds and fast drying time, they clean-up with water, and they are non-toxic. They are the preferred glue by many ship modelers.

 

 

 

By adding these, it gives us the opportunity to make beginner combo sets that are safer for younger first-time builders. Watch for those soon.

Ages of Sail is also proud to announce that it will soon be carrying the full line of Historic Ship Paints. These water-based acrylic paints are color matched specifically for ship modelers. They come in 2 ounce jars in a line that includes water-based stains and finishes. Look for them soon on our website.

Finally, while the Historic Ships Paints includes metallics, we find that the best metallic finish comes from oil based paints. We experiment with some options and decided to carry Testors brand paint markers. We’re only stocking Gold markers at this time, as that’s the primary need for wooden ship model builders.

These markers produce an excellent gold finish that’s difficult to get from acrylic paints. Markers also remove the need for brush cleanup and reduce the chance of messy paint spills. You still need to take precautions to make sure you’re working in a well ventilated area, but the cap keeps the marker sealed, and without the need for paint thinner and brush cleaner, vapors are kept to a minimum.

The gold paint markers and Titebond glue are available now at Ages of Sail.

Pirated Products on the Internet

An important commentary on pirated ship model kits that are appearing in large numbers on the Internet.

The Ship Modeler

I would like all ship modelers to beware and understand the significance and impact of many kits that are appearing from a number of Chinese companies on the Internet.

The amount of work necessary to research and design ship model kits is a major part of the expense of producing good quality kits. It is unfortunate then that unscrupulous individuals and companies are stealing work that has been legitimately produced at great cost and expense, using the work to produce their own knockoff products and either making their kits more attractive by adding their own details, or undercutting the pricing of legitimate manufacturers, or both.

The problem is rampant, and many ship modelers are aware of what’s going on, but ignore the issue for their own benefit and to the detriment of the dedicated, legitimate ship modeling industry, and it is having an impact on the very companies that have…

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Summer Shipments In

At Ages of Sail, we’ve been getting a lot of shipments coming in over the past week. Today, we just stocked up on Caldercraft kits.  Over the last couple weeks, we received a large shipment of kits from Occre and we’ve restocked our assortment of Amati fittings and tools. And, of course, we get regular shipments of Artesania Latina and Dumas products.

So, if you’ve been looking for something that’s been out of stock, or just want to see our huge assortment of products, check us out at Ages of Sail!

Two More New Easy Build Kits from Amati

Amati just released two more kits of their 1st Step series of easy to build ship model kits, bringing the series to a total of 6 kits.

Up to this point, we’ve had the Pirate Ship, the Elizabethan Galleon, the HMS Bounty and the Santa Maria. Amati has just added the Niña and the Mayflower, two famous ships that brought Europeans to the “New World”.

Amati’s 1st Step Mayflower

 

Amati’s 1st Step Niña

The new products are both about 1:135 scale like most of the 1st Step kits, and include pre-shaped hulls with a unique, self-aligning design that sandwiches a laser-cut board that includes the keel, stem and stern post, between two halves of the hull, making for a perfectly shaped hull.

The kit includes laser-cut parts, a variety of dowels and strip woods, wood and metal fittings, sail cloth, rigging line, a wooden stand and pedestals to display your completed model, and a printed sheet of flags, and in some cases, colorful hull decorations. Includes an easy to follow, fold-out sheet of step-by-step directions written in English and Italian.

Here are some photos of what you’ll get in a typical 1st Step kit, showing the 1st Step Elizabethan Galleon kit.

 

 

 

 

These are ideal starter kits and require only basic tools, glue, and paints. They also make great projects for more experienced modelers who just want something fun and quick to build.

Check out these and the other newest kits from Amati Model at Ages of Sail:

http://www.agesofsail.com/ecommerce/amati-kits/new-items.html

Last of our Mamoli Stock

Mamoli kits were once a mainstay of the wooden ship modeling community, but after a big fire shut down Mamoli for good, our large stock of Mamoli kits has been shrinking steadily.

The Sao Miguel is one of the most unique kits available anywhere, representing a three-masted carrack from very early 16th century. We have five of these kits left at the moment, and when they’re gone, they’re gone!

Dusek Ship Kits has purchased the rights to produce Mamoli kits again, but it has taken until recently for them to re-release the Mini-Mamoli kits, which are simple designs. Chances are good that we will see a couple of these kits re-released later this year, but we have no information which ones they will be, or even if these will all be re-released.

Mamolis kit of the French Lugger Le Coureur

So, if you’ve been missing Mamoli kits and there is one you’re interested, the list below shows the remaining stock. Some kits, we are likely to have in stock for a while, but watch out for those with only 1 or 2 remaining!

  • MV19 Roter Lowe  x4
  • MV21 Sao Miguel  x5
  • MV22 Blue Shadown  x4
  • MV24 Friesland  x1
  • MV25 Marseille  x3
  • MV26 America  x12
  • MV29 Il Leudo  x4
  • MV31 USS Constitution  x2
  • MV33 Gretel x2
  • MV34 Le Gloire x5
  • MV35 Hunter  x5
  • MV36 Rattlesnake x1
  • MV37 Halifax x4
  • MV38 Le Coureur  x4
  • MV40 Royal Louis x2
  • MV41 Flying Cloud x5
  • MV45 Portsmouth  x4
  • MV46 Black Prince  x2
  • MV48 Lexington  x7
  • MV49 Mayflower  x3
  • MV43 Puritan x1
  • MV51 Catalina  x5
  • MV54 Jenny  x2
  • MV56 HMS Victory x2
  • MV57 Amerigo Vespucci  x8
  • MV59 Swift  x9
  • MV80 Prince  x16
  • MV81 Valliant  x11
  • MV82 Blackbeard  x6

Since Mamoli is no more, please keep in mind we can’t get replacement parts for these.

If you’re interested in one of the easy to build Mini-Mamoli kits, you’re in luck, as we have a complete stock of these, with more shipments coming in from Dusek Ship Models, which is now producing these kits.

Here’s a direct link to the Mamoli products at Ages of Sail: http://www.agesofsail.com/ecommerce/mamoli.html

Two Billing Boats kits just added, Frigate Jylland and HMS Warrior

We’ve carried Billing Boats kits for quite a while, but we’re working now to expand our retail selection of these kits. There will be more Billing Boats kits forthcoming, including a couple fairly recent releases. But, for now, here are two classic warships from the transitionary period between sail and steam, the Danish frigate Jylland and the British iron-hulled warship HMS Warrior.

Both of the original ships are still in existence  and represent the last ships of their kind. They are available for public access, so you can still walk the decks of these beautiful vessels. And, if you can’t get to them, there should be plenty of photos on the Internet to help you make the most accurate build possible.

In fact, here are a couple photos we found on the web…

HMS Warrior

Frigate Jylland

Both Billing Boats kits are “Expert” level models, so we don’t recommend you attempt them without a fair amount of experience. The kits feature plank-on-bulkhead construction and include laser-cut frames. Many major parts are also laser cut. Fittings provided included wooden blocks, and fittings in brass, wood or plastic fittings.

 

The Frigate Jylland, BB5003

The frigate ‘Jylland’ was the last warship of the Danish Royal Navy built of oak. It was launched on 20 January 1860. ‘Jylland’ was also the first steam-powered, screwdriven ship and at an engine out-put of 400 hp was able to reach the then impressive speed of 12 knots. A noteworthy feature that should be mentioned is that the screw could be raised up into a ‘screw- well’ so that it did not slow the ship down under sail. On 9th May 1864 ‘Jylland’ fought in the Battle of Heligoland against a fleet of Austrian and Prussian ships. King Christian IX used the ship on various visits to Iceland and Russia. The 2450-ton ‘Jylland’ had a hull lenght of 71m (96m overall) and a beam of 13,5m. The ship had a crew of between 405 and 437 men, depending on the ship´s duties, and carried 44 muzzle-loaded cannons. In 1960 ‘Jylland’ was towed by tugs from the naval base in Copenhagen to Ebeltoft. On 11 August 1984 it made its last voyage – into a new exhibition dock. After several years of restoration work, Frigate ‘Jylland’ was opened to the public. For those with an interest in ships and life at sea, this 130-year-old ship is certainly worth visiting.

The completed model measures 39.8″ in length and 24.8″ in height and sells regularly for $599. To celebrate the addition of this model, we’re taking 10% off, now through September 1st. We only have 5 of these kits available at the time of this writing, so act fast if you want to get one, especially at this price.

 

HMS Warrior, BB512

The Warrior was designed and built in response to an aggressive French shipbuilding program which saw the introduction of the first iron-clad warship La Gloire. The Royal Navy was determined to meet this challenge of supremacy and build a ship so superior in terms of quality, speed, size, armament and armour that it would be inconceivable to France that she could take Britain on in a sea battle. August 1, 1861, The Warrior was the largest warship in the world, at 9,210 tons displacement, she was fully 60% larger than the La Gloire. June 1862 she started active service in the Channel Squadron. In 1871 she was no longer the crack ship she had once been, and was downgraded to Coast Guard and reserve services. The Warrior was eventually converted to a floating school for the Navy and re-named Vernon III in 1904. By 1978, she was the only surviving example of the ‘Black Battlefleet’, the 45 iron hulls built for the Royal Navy between 1861 and 1877.

This is a BIG model! The completed model measures 57.9″ in length and 26.5″ in height and sells regularly for $755.95. Again, to celebrate the addition of this model, we’re offering the kit at 10% off, now through September 1st. We only have 13 of these kits in our warehouse, so we don’t expect to run out anytime soon. But, if you want to take advantage of the special pricing, make sure to act by September 1st!

Click the links below to check out the kits now at Ages of Sail:

 

A fine exhibit and publication about model ship building!

Found this blog post which is several months old now. But, we just checked with the San Diego Maritime Museum, and the exhibit, titled “Steering Small” is still open. We couldn’t find out how long it will continue to be there, so if you want to see this wonderful looking display on ship modeling, better go now!

If we find out more information, we’ll pass it along. The exhibit is in the Gould Eddy Hall aboard the ferryboat Berkeley.

Cool San Diego Sights!

An amazing ship model by artist Joe Frangiosa, Jr. One of many fantastic examples in a big, special exhibit at the Maritime Museum of San Diego. An amazing ship model by artist Joe Frangiosa, Jr. One of many fantastic examples in an extensive, special exhibition at the Maritime Museum of San Diego.

The Maritime Museum of San Diego currently has an exhibit that’s a lot of fun. It concerns collecting model ships and model ship building! Anyone interested in the hobby or nautical history in general should check it out!

I took a few photos to provide just a taste of what you’ll see. Bring your kids! They’ll love it!

Detailed model of a 74 gun two-decker British Ship of the Line, circa 1800. By artist Joe Frangiosa, Jr. Detailed model of a 74 gun two-decker British Ship of the Line, circa 1800. By artist Joe Frangiosa, Jr.

Half a dozen ship models in different scales of the San Salvador, historic galleon of explorer Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo, who discovered San Diego Bay for Spain in 1542. Half a dozen ship models in different scales of the San Salvador, historic galleon of explorer Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo, who discovered San Diego Bay for Spain in 1542.

Tiny models of classic cruise ships, including the famous Titanic. Tiny models of classic cruise ships, including the famous Titanic.

A Native American ancient ship model. This pecked stone boat effigy was found in 2012 on San Clemente Island. It's at least 1000 years old. A Native American ancient ship model. This pecked stone…

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Shipyard Quay Port Kits Online

One product that we have been very slow to put up onto Ages of Sail is the line of card model Quay Port kits produced by the Polish manufacturer, Shipyard. But, all that has changed. We’ve just put the final updates on our site with all of these kits listed.

HMS Wolf at Chatham, 1754

Like the ship model kits, these Quay Port kits come in either 1/96-scale or 1/72-scale. Being part of the Laser Cut Model series, these kits include laser-cut parts and must be painted. They are also designed to accommodate a specific model kit. In the above example, the 1/72-scale Chatham Quay Port kit is designed to work with the 1/72-scale Laser Cardboard kit of HMS Wolf. However, these kits are also designed to be displayed without a ship, if that’s what you choose.

HMS Endeavour at Deptford, 1768

Will the Quay Port kit accommodate another  ship model that’s it’s not designed for? We can’t really answer that as we’ve yet to build one of these. But, it seems that if you’re willing to deal with the necessary modifications, then why not? And, if that’s the case, that would mean you should be able to adapt it to your wooden ship model, if that’s what you’re looking for.

There are 9 different models and scales to choose from, and we carry them all at Ages of Sail. Pick your favorite Quay Port and the corresponding Ship Model kit, and make sure you select the correct scale for your build.

HMS Mercury at Chatham, 1780

In addition to these kits, we also have begun carrying some of the individual dock yard equipment pieces. So, you can add an extra shed, extra crane, or whatever.

Add some more accessories!

The Dutch Fluit Schwarzer Rabe at Amsterdam, 1627

Again, you don’t have to add a ship to be able to build a nice Quay Port model. So, if you don’t feel up to the challenge of ship modeling, you can stick with just the Quay Port. Also, consider the models in the photos show ships under construction. If you want to try a ship model, but are worried about the rigging, you can stop before you get there, and build a Quay Port scene out of it. And, if you do complete the ship model, what a great way to display it!

Now, if you want to try a ship and Quay Port combination, but are low on cash, there is one paper model version available. It comes with the 1/96-scale Baltimore Clipper Berbice Paper Model kit.

The kit is something more of a challenge in that you have to cut out all the parts yourself, etc. But, you get the Quay Port kit, you get the ship model kit – it’s a great combination!

Check out all the Shipyard Quay Port kits at Ages of Sail:

http://www.agesofsail.com/ecommerce/paper-kits/quayport-kits.html